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Electricity Museum (Museu da Electricidade)
Electricity Museum (Museu da Electricidade)

Electricity Museum (Museu da Electricidade)

Free admission
Av. Brasília, Lisbon, Portugal

The Basics

The exhibitions at the Electricity Museum(Museu da Electricidade) are not the only interesting thing about the place. The red-brick structure, which sits on the banks of the Tagus river and took almost a half-century to complete, is an excellent example of early–20th-century industrial architecture and beautifully complements the more modern art exhibits. The museum is a somewhat hidden treasure, often overshadowed by MAAT, its more modern relative.

Many small-group and private Tagus river tours discuss the importance of the museum as they sail past. For those wanting to sightsee at their own pace, Lisbon and Belém hop-on hop-off tours stop at the Electricity Museum.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Electricity Museum(Museu da Electricidade) is a must for those interested in the arts and sciences.

  • Most visitors spend about 1.5 hours exploring the exhibits.

  • Guided tours of the power station are available for a small fee and are conducted in Portuguese and English, upon request.

  • An ATM and vending machines are available on the premises.

  • The entire museum is accessible to those with limited mobility.

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How to Get There

The Electricity Museum(Museu da Electricidade) is in Lisbon’s Belém district, adjacent to the MAAT building. Take the Cascais train line from Cais do Sodré to the Belém station, a 10-minute walk from the museum. Alternatively, take tram 15 or city bus 201, 714, 727, or 751 to the Altinho bus stop, also a 10-minute walk away. If driving, there is free public parking at the museum.

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When to Get There

The Electricity Museum(Museu da Electricidade) is open 11am to 7pm Wednesday to Monday, with free entry on the first Sunday of each month. This free day and Mondays tend to be the busiest, as most Lisbon museums are closed on the latter. For a quieter experience, visit the museum in the early afternoon.

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The History of the Power Station

Built in 1908, the Tejo Power Station had 15 small boilers and five generating sets that provided power to the city of Lisbon. It operated in full capacity until 1954 and then partially until the 1970s, when cleaner forms of energy were introduced. Today the museum provides an interactive experience that looks at the evolution of electricity from the early days up to renewable energy. In 2016 the museum became part of MAAT and now also includes contemporary art exhibits.

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